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BBSLG Members’ Forum – Twitter demo

July 8, 2009
How not to use Twitter

How not to use Twitter

As I mentioned in my previous post, I did a quick demo of Twitter during the Members’ Forum at the BBSLG conference last week – the few slides I used can be found on Slideshare.

At the beginning of the session a show of hands indicated that around 20 (approximately half of the group) people already had Twitter accounts. Of those about 10 tweeted once a week and only 2 or 3 tweeted once a day or more. This had been my suspicion and so I angled my talk to focus on why you should give Twitter another try.

The session seemed to go down well – it’s always encouraging to see lots of nods from the audience. And I’m pleased to see at the last count 6 new BBSLG followers – hopefully they’ll be more to come.

As ever immediately after I sat down I though of a million and one other things I could have said to help people get started. So, inspired by Jo Alcock’s presentation at the New Professionals’ conference, here are my top tips for anyone about to get started on Twitter:

  1. Upload a picture – show us you’re human. It doesn’t have to be a photo of you, although it is nice, but just something that shows a bit of your personality.
  2. Write a bio – for the same reason as before really. Prospective followers will want to learn a bit about you first.
  3. Follow, follow, follow – to get the most out of Twitter right from the word go you need to find people to follow and lots of them. As I mentioned in my talk find a few at first and then use their follower lists to find more like minded people.
  4. Share – this not only goes for what you’re doing but what you’re reading, viewing, thinking. Vary your tweets. Link to blog posts and articles you’ve found interesting and tell your followers why.
  5. Engage – it’s easy to be passive but you’ll get more out of Twitter if you get involved. If someone asks a question answer it. If someone posts something of interest to you retweet it. Make yourself visible and get involved. It goes back to that old saying you get out what you put in.
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One Comment leave one →
  1. July 8, 2009 15:30

    Great tips, fully agree with each of those points. Nice to see there are quite a few business librarians using Twitter, I’ve added a couple from your slides and a few others found me on the day of the demo too.

    Was good to meet you at the New Professionals Conference on Monday. :)

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